Friday, May 22, 2020

Islamic Architecture - 1175 Words

Islamic Architecture in the UAE Many cities all over the world are developing to become important urban areas in all respects like Tokyo, New York and Mumbai. Every city has some reasons for their develop like building factories, importance of the location and much more. On the other hand there are some cities that had decline like Detroit, Flint and Cleveland because they only have depended on one resource for income. Abu Dhabi has grown through its economic vision and it is trying to sustainable its development through diversification to avoid declining. Development and growth in cities is shown through some reasons. The strategic location of the city. For this reason, most major cities are on rivers or at the†¦show more content†¦Abu Dhabi is taking steps to reassess its 2030 economic vision, acknowledging slower economic and population growth due to the impact of the global financial crisis (Arnold, 2010). The plan is trying to diversifying the emirates economy away from oil (Arnold, 2010). The idea behind Abu Dhabi’s economic diversification is that if oil prices go down there will be other sources for income (Kumar, 2011). Abu Dhabi Council for Development declared that Emirate’s 2030 strategy will not degrade oil and gas’s importance (Kumar, 2011). Instead it is focusing in which it has traditionally been strong, like wholesale and retail, international and domestic trade, transport and storage and tourism (Sekhri, 2010). Also Abu Dhabi had made many projects into petrochemicals, steel and aluminu m sectors and created investor-friendly industrial zones to insure its future growth (Kumar, 2011). The UAE seems unlikely to catch up with the level of economic expansion displayed in the leading emerging market economies such as China and India, which benefit from bigger populations and more diversified economies (Arnold, 2010). According to the annual economic report for the emirate of Abu Dhabi 2010, Abu Dhabi plans to raise the foreign direct investment to 23 per cent of GDP by 2030 (Kumar, 2011).Show MoreRelatedTaking a Look at Islamic Architecture1006 Words   |  4 Pages Definition of Islamic Architecture Islamic architecture is defined as building traditions of Muslim populations of the Middle East and any countries where Islam had been dominated from the 7th century. History of Islamic Architecture In 630C.E the city of Mecca was re-conquered by Muhammad’s army from the Banu Quraish tribe. Before Muhammad’s death they began rebuilding the holy ka’ba and rededicated it to Islam in 632C.E by a shipwrecked Abyssinian carpenter in his native style. Then in the 7thRead MoreHow Islamic Architecture in Spain Changed from the Seventh Century to the Mid-sixteenth Century1541 Words   |  7 Pagessymbolized its essence. The Great Mosque of Cà ³rdoba was built by Arab architects in the eighth century and then a cathedral was added by Christian conquers in the sixteenth century . Islam was born in the seventh century but Islamic architectures’ uniqueness among other architectures appeared in the eighth century after the death of the Prophet Mohammad in 632 . The Roman Empire was the most important empire and it was recognized by its central location, which dominated not only Europe but also the wholeRead MoreMughal Architecture : The Unmistakable Indo Islamic Building Style Essay1056 Words   |  5 Pages Mughal architecture ï  ¶ Introduction: Mughal design is the unmistakable Indo-Islamic building style that created in northern and focal India under the support of Mughal sovereigns from the sixteenth to the eighteenth century. It is a strikingly symmetrical and enriching amalgam of Persian, Turkish, and Indian engineering. The Mughals were additionally prestigious for making choice gardens in the Persian format, in which the quadrilateral greenery enclosures were separated by walkways or streamingRead MoreEssay about The Bibi-Khanym Mosque1720 Words   |  7 PagesEmperor Timur remarkably expanded his small tribe into the Timurid Dynasty, which lasted from 1370 to 1507. Timur showed great leadership skills and also had an interest in architecture. The results of his artistic interests are especially apparent in Samarkand, the capital of the Timurids during Timur’s reign where art, architecture, and culture flourished. The Bibi Khanum exemplifies the vision that Timur held for Samarkand because of the monumentâ₠¬â„¢s dominant and massive nature. Although today theRead MoreHagia Sophia vs Dome of the Rock984 Words   |  4 PagesReligion has always played an important role in the development of art and architecture. They serve as a bridge between the real world and the divine world, and mirror religious views of people and the major beliefs of the society. Hagia Sophia and the Dome of the Rock are two of the greatest and the most important architectural monuments in the world. Even though two of the most historical mosques, Hagia Sophia and the Dome of the Rock, are built for different religions, but due toRead MoreElements Of Islamic Culture And The Dome1989 Words   |  8 Pagesconsidered one of the most important architectural elements in Islamic culture and the dome became a very important architectural element during the Ottoman time period and many of these domes drew from earlier Islamic and the Hellenistic Roman world. The dome is one of the most important elements of the Ottoman time period and they were known for being one of the main cultures in history to incorporate domes as a main component in their architecture. Ottomans used domes in mosques (the largest domes wereRead MoreThe Dome Of The Rock And Alhambra Essay1378 Words   |  6 Pages The two Islamic structures are the Dome of the rock and alhambra. It is likely that both structures were built for the same purpose. The Dome of the Rock has no distinct known purpose that modern investigators have discovered but it was likely to have been built with the purpose of impressing the region with the power and the emergence of Islamic control. alhambra was built as a palace complex to house the leaders of Granada and into likely establish the dynasty of the Nasrid. Although built toRead MoreThe Great Mosque Of Cordoba2023 Words   |  9 PagesThe Mishrab of The Great Mosque of Cordoba Assignment Two The Great Mosque of Cordoba [named in espaà ±ol Mezquita – Catedral de Cà ³rdoba] is a complex site of extraordinarily rich history and key development in Muslim architecture in a Western empire. Built in the Spanish capitals of the Umayyad, it is one of the oldest structures from the times of Muslim rule over Iberia in the 8th century, the Great Mosque of Cordoba is a heritage site having lived through tremendous successions of change, developmentRead MoreAncient Islamic Art And Architecture1735 Words   |  7 PagesQur’anic inscriptions in Islamic art and architecture are common use to honor the words of God. These features not only illustrate the direct relationship between Allah and the Muslims, but they also represent a set of rules that seek to unify different religious groups under Islamic caliphate and design a reminder for citizens to pass on Islamic traditions to future generations. This set of rules defines the authoritarian importance of Islamic law disap proval of iconography of any kind. The Qur’anRead MoreEgyptian, Islamic and Roman Architecture Essay1539 Words   |  7 Pagesbecause its contributions to the world still seen, studied and absorbers. Egypt contribution has come along way and has mad an impact in on thousands of cultures worldwide. Some of Egypt’s contributions I will address are arts, literature and architecture. The Egyptians had little wood to build their buildings and monuments. The Egyptians lived in the desert where there was little vegetation, so they had to rely upon other kinds of building materials other than forest products. The Egyptians turned

Sunday, May 10, 2020

Essay on What Shapes Pip’s Character in Great Expectations

What influences shape the character of young Pip in Great Expectations? â€Å"Great Expectations†, by Charles Dickens, is an enthralling tale of love and fortune. The story is set in the period of Dickens’ childhood, from 1810 to approximately 1830, and it is likely that memories of his own youth inspired Dickens to write the novel. The main character, Pip, is a gentle and humble boy whose character and personality undergo major transformations throughout the novel. He is influenced by many characters, in particular Estella, the hard-hearted girl from Satis House, and Magwitch, the convict from the marshes. From the first page of the novel, Pip is introduced as an orphan and he enlightens the reader â€Å"I never saw my father or my†¦show more content†¦This is apparent when Pip narrates: â€Å"every board upon the way, and every crack in every board, calling after me, `Stop thief! and `Get up, Mrs Joe!† It is due to Mrs Joe that Pip develops a conscience and as a result she is crucial to his upbringing. Joe builds a solid and amiable relationship with Pip. Pip depicts him as â€Å"a mild, good-natured, sweet-tempered, easy-going, foolish, dear fellow† and because of this, and also the fact that they are the only males in the household, Pip finds him easy to get along with. This can be seen when Joe covers for Pip when he is late home or when he says â€Å"ever the best of friends; an’t us Pip?† Joe is Pip’s first and closest friend who comforts the boy in hard times. However, to Pip, Joe is not just a companion but also in some ways a paternal and even a maternal figure. Their relationship means that Pip is able to talk to Joe openly about any subject and therefore Joe has a very positive effect on Pip through his love. Pip loves Joe for what he is and in his childhood dreams of becoming Joe’s apprentice to become a blacksmith. However, Pip’s relationship with Joe begins to change after Pip pays his frequent visits to Satis House. Pip begins to feel ashamed of Joe because he is illiterate and the young boy feels that becoming a blacksmith is not the right choice to make. Dickens writes that Pip hates working as Joe’s apprentice – â€Å"Once it had seemed to me that when I shouldShow MoreRelatedGreat Expectations By Charles Dickens1324 Words   |  6 PagesIn Great Expectations, Charles Dickens rejects conventional Victorian class stratification, using Pip s Bildungsroman to demonstrate that social mobility can be achieved through mor al education, experience and personal development, rather than the simple acquisition of wealth. The compassion Pip learns from Joe leads him to assist Magwitch, which ultimately results in Pip becoming a gentleman. The secondary characters in Pip’s Bildungsroman help him to find a place within society where he can finallyRead MoreCharles Dickens Great Expectations Essay examples1100 Words   |  5 PagesGreat Expectations Essay Topic: Why is Great Expectations called Great Expectations? There is an old clichà © that cautions readers not to â€Å"judge a book by its cover†, but rather, by its contents. While this piece of advice may indeed be true, one could ask if the same is true of judging a book by its title. The title of a book is in many ways indicative, not only of its contents, but perhaps more important, of its author’s message. A title serves to inspire the reader’s interest, whileRead MoreJoe Gargery Character Analysis716 Words   |  3 Pagescare, love, and listen to him, and Joe Gargery was that person for Pip. In the novel, The Great Expectation, Joe Gargery, Pip’s brother-in-law who whole heartedly takes Pip in and raised him as his own, became a father to Pip. As the novel progresses, Joe eventually became more than a father; he was Pip’s confidant, his conscience, and Dickens uses Joe to bring a moral side to the novel. In The Great Expectations, Charles Dickens characterizes Joe Gargery as a commendable guy, who does things out ofRead MoreAnalysis Of Great Expectations 1026 Words   |  5 PagesEarly Life Influences In novels, character development, If not always, relies upon the doings and variations of other characters they interact with. In the infamous novel, Great Expectations, Pip’s brother-in-law, Joe, is considered to be one of the most dependable and loyal characters to Pip, despite having adverse personalities. For example, where Pip is known to be zealous and eager to move forward with things at almost any cost, Joe is more of a steady, content man who would much rather stayRead MoreSocial Advancement Versus Affection, Loyalty, And Conscience1114 Words   |  5 Pagesto work hard to gain the respect of others or of their fellow citizens. In Charles Dickens Great Expectations, the main character Pip realizes this and longs to become a part of the upper class society to receive its perks. This bildungsroman of Pip’s life shows how social advancement is not more important than affection, loyalty, and self conscience through the use of details, symbols and motifs. Pip’s early life is detailed to show that it is not an ideal one. With both his parents deceased,Read MorePip in Charles Dickens Great Expectations and Jem and Scout in Harper Lees To Kill a Mockingbird1381 Words   |  6 PagesBoth Pip in Charles Dickens Great Expectations and Jem and Scout in Harper Lees To Kill a Mockingbird have deep fears in early childhood. How do the authors create these fears and vulnerabilities? Charles Dickens Great Expectations and Harper Lees To Kill a Mockingbird are two very different books. Great Expectations tells the story of a young boy growing up in Kent at the beginning of the 19th century, and To Kill a Mocking Bird centres around two children growing up in AmericaRead MoreA Great Conclusion Given to Great Expectations by Charles Dickens961 Words   |  4 PagesEstella’s character, it is far more conclusive in comparison to the original, and it reveals a little more about Pip’s growth in character and traits. Throughout the course of the novel, Estella is perceived to be this cold-hearted reptile, but this is contradicted in Charles Dickens’ rewritten ending, when she is instead written to have grown much more open and warm towards Pip, exemplifying her growth and development in character. Although Great Expectations mainly revolves around Pip’s adventuresRead MoreGreat Expectations1707 Words   |  7 PagesGreat Expectations Human nature is the psychological and social qualities that characterize humankind. Human nature separates humans from the rest of the animal kingdom. The underlining theme of human nature is evident in Great Expectation by Charles Dickens use of his characters. A main characteristic that Dickens displays is friendship. The friendship between Pip and Herbert is strong. Herbert was significant to Pip’s growth in social class and eventual to his revelation. â€Å"Friendship was oneRead MoreDickens Techniques of Characterisation in Great Expectations1117 Words   |  5 Pagesof Characterisation in Great Expectations Many characters in Great Expectations are a rich and varied mix of personalities, in particular Pip, Joe Gargery and Mrs. Joe. The physical description of the characters is an example of the techniques used by Charles Dickens. Other techniques include the speech and habits of the characters, the characters interaction with others, the choice of the characters name and their surroundingsRead MoreChapter 39 Great Expectations Essay1217 Words   |  5 PagesChapter 39 is a Pivotal One, Why? How does Dickens communicate the importance of the drama of the chapter to the reader? In chapter 39, Pips benefactor is revealed. It is around this person that the mystery of Pips expectations is built. It is a pivotal chapter in the way the plot develops. In this chapter Pip finally accepts that the way he acted in London was wrong and that chasing Estella was very pointless. The importance and drama of this chapter can be seen from the beginning. Dickens

Wednesday, May 6, 2020

General Sociology †Code of the Streets Free Essays

In the article â€Å"The Code of the Street† by Elijah Anderson, he allows a glimpse of everyday life through the eyes of two completely different worlds wrapped up within one universe. He compares street families to what he refers to as â€Å"decent families†. Although the meaning can take on different perceptions to the eye of the beholder, the author described it as a code of civility at one end of conduct regulated by the threat of violence. We will write a custom essay sample on General Sociology – Code of the Streets or any similar topic only for you Order Now Within these most economically drugged, crime-related, and depressing neighborhoods, the rules of civil action have been severely weakened, and their stead of survival known as this â€Å"code of the street† often holds many their key to survival. The book Essentials of sociology gives four different theories on why crime exists, they are the functionalist theory, the internationalist theory, conflict theory, and control theory. The theory I believe best relates to Andersons article is the internationalist theory. The author presented only two groups of people which categorized their existence within the social contest among individuals and families of the neighborhood, the â€Å"decent† and the â€Å"street. † I thought that they were kind of broad terms and that maybe they shouldn’t necessarily be â€Å"categorized† but they should be more of a description of people. Because there can be many â€Å"decent† people and they can still know the street. The internationalist theory basically implies that crime is learned from the things you observe in life and your interactions with people around you. The first place Anderson says people in impoverished areas learn crime is at a young age from the family. Children are always influence by their parents and Anderson says â€Å"those street oriented adults with whom children come in contact with including mothers, fathers, brothers, sisters, boyfriends, cousins, neighbors, and friends-help them in forming this understanding by verbalizing the messages they are getting through experience: â€Å"watch your back. † â€Å"Protect yourself. † â€Å"Don’t punk out. † â€Å"If someone messes with you got to pay them back. † â€Å"If someone dishes you got to straighten them out.† many parents actually impose sanctions if a child is not sufficiently aggressive. † This shows that children can even be punished for not being aggressive enough, so they will have a tendency to be more violent and commit more crime Street families are overwhelmed with the demands of parenting which means kids to have to be able to take care of themselves more which leads to a dependence on the code of the streets and Anderson says† families, who are more fully invested in the code of the streets than the decent people are, may aggressively socialize their children into it.† This means children are taught to be aggressive from a young age so they can better take care of themselves and survive in their environment. Another example Anderson gives of children growing up around violence in poorer areas is many parents have financial problems caused by drug use which causes more violence and exposes the child to more crime. Another place Anderson says children are exposed to crime is in the streets. He says, â€Å"Realities of inner city life are largely absorbed on the streets.† One reason Anderson says children gravitate towards being in the streets is a lack of supervision at home or a home environment not fit for children. He notes that the children who hang out in the street are allowed to â€Å"rip and run up and down the street† which shows that from a young age these children are being taught they can do anything they want, and in poorer areas it only takes a matter of time before they start getting involved in crime. Also many kids may not be looking to commit any crimes but because they hang-out in the street they are perceived as criminals, and the eventually except the label and actually start committing crime. This concept is known as the labeling theory. It shows that it is not the act of being in the street that causes crime it is the way people react to people being in the streets that cause them to commit crimes. Another aspect of life children in poorer areas observe and emulate is respect and reputation. When you don’t have many physical possession ones reputation is seen as all that one has. Anderson talks about how from a young age that a child â€Å" to maintain his honor he must show he is not someone to be â€Å"messed with† or â€Å"diced† the article also talks about how in urban societies â€Å"it is a basic requirement to show a certain disposition to violence† meaning in order to keep up with you reputation you must show that you can be violent and commit crime, and if this is the way the majority of people living in these areas think there is no wonder there is so much crime. The last reason Anderson gives that I believe gives children the impression they must commit crimes if they live in poor areas is the areas they live in themselves. They are poorer areas so living is already a struggle, and kids see that crime is an easy way to get a lot for a little; they can rob someone in two seconds and have money to eat with. An example Anderson gives of this state of mind is â€Å"a boy wearing a fashionable, expensive jacket, for example is vulnerable to attack by another who covets the jacket, and either can’t afford to buy one or wants the added satisfaction of depriving someone else.† Anderson also mentions how sometimes in these neighborhoods police won’t even show p and when kids see that there neighborhood is too dangerous for police it is easier to say I will become a part of it instead of becoming a victim. In conclusion I believe that the internationalist theory best describes Andersons article â€Å"The Code of the Streets† and like it says in the book deviance is learned through interaction with others. Crime in particular is learned through experiences growing up at home, hanging out in the streets, trying to gain reputation, and experiences and interaction with where you live and the community you live in. How to cite General Sociology – Code of the Streets, Papers

General Sociology †Code of the Streets Free Essays

In the article â€Å"The Code of the Street† by Elijah Anderson, he allows a glimpse of everyday life through the eyes of two completely different worlds wrapped up within one universe. He compares street families to what he refers to as â€Å"decent families†. Although the meaning can take on different perceptions to the eye of the beholder, the author described it as a code of civility at one end of conduct regulated by the threat of violence. We will write a custom essay sample on General Sociology – Code of the Streets or any similar topic only for you Order Now Within these most economically drugged, crime-related, and depressing neighborhoods, the rules of civil action have been severely weakened, and their stead of survival known as this â€Å"code of the street† often holds many their key to survival. The book Essentials of sociology gives four different theories on why crime exists, they are the functionalist theory, the internationalist theory, conflict theory, and control theory. The theory I believe best relates to Andersons article is the internationalist theory. The author presented only two groups of people which categorized their existence within the social contest among individuals and families of the neighborhood, the â€Å"decent† and the â€Å"street. † I thought that they were kind of broad terms and that maybe they shouldn’t necessarily be â€Å"categorized† but they should be more of a description of people. Because there can be many â€Å"decent† people and they can still know the street. The internationalist theory basically implies that crime is learned from the things you observe in life and your interactions with people around you. The first place Anderson says people in impoverished areas learn crime is at a young age from the family. Children are always influence by their parents and Anderson says â€Å"those street oriented adults with whom children come in contact with including mothers, fathers, brothers, sisters, boyfriends, cousins, neighbors, and friends-help them in forming this understanding by verbalizing the messages they are getting through experience: â€Å"watch your back. † â€Å"Protect yourself. † â€Å"Don’t punk out. † â€Å"If someone messes with you got to pay them back. † â€Å"If someone dishes you got to straighten them out.† many parents actually impose sanctions if a child is not sufficiently aggressive. † This shows that children can even be punished for not being aggressive enough, so they will have a tendency to be more violent and commit more crime Street families are overwhelmed with the demands of parenting which means kids to have to be able to take care of themselves more which leads to a dependence on the code of the streets and Anderson says† families, who are more fully invested in the code of the streets than the decent people are, may aggressively socialize their children into it.† This means children are taught to be aggressive from a young age so they can better take care of themselves and survive in their environment. Another example Anderson gives of children growing up around violence in poorer areas is many parents have financial problems caused by drug use which causes more violence and exposes the child to more crime. Another place Anderson says children are exposed to crime is in the streets. He says, â€Å"Realities of inner city life are largely absorbed on the streets.† One reason Anderson says children gravitate towards being in the streets is a lack of supervision at home or a home environment not fit for children. He notes that the children who hang out in the street are allowed to â€Å"rip and run up and down the street† which shows that from a young age these children are being taught they can do anything they want, and in poorer areas it only takes a matter of time before they start getting involved in crime. Also many kids may not be looking to commit any crimes but because they hang-out in the street they are perceived as criminals, and the eventually except the label and actually start committing crime. This concept is known as the labeling theory. It shows that it is not the act of being in the street that causes crime it is the way people react to people being in the streets that cause them to commit crimes. Another aspect of life children in poorer areas observe and emulate is respect and reputation. When you don’t have many physical possession ones reputation is seen as all that one has. Anderson talks about how from a young age that a child â€Å" to maintain his honor he must show he is not someone to be â€Å"messed with† or â€Å"diced† the article also talks about how in urban societies â€Å"it is a basic requirement to show a certain disposition to violence† meaning in order to keep up with you reputation you must show that you can be violent and commit crime, and if this is the way the majority of people living in these areas think there is no wonder there is so much crime. The last reason Anderson gives that I believe gives children the impression they must commit crimes if they live in poor areas is the areas they live in themselves. They are poorer areas so living is already a struggle, and kids see that crime is an easy way to get a lot for a little; they can rob someone in two seconds and have money to eat with. An example Anderson gives of this state of mind is â€Å"a boy wearing a fashionable, expensive jacket, for example is vulnerable to attack by another who covets the jacket, and either can’t afford to buy one or wants the added satisfaction of depriving someone else.† Anderson also mentions how sometimes in these neighborhoods police won’t even show p and when kids see that there neighborhood is too dangerous for police it is easier to say I will become a part of it instead of becoming a victim. In conclusion I believe that the internationalist theory best describes Andersons article â€Å"The Code of the Streets† and like it says in the book deviance is learned through interaction with others. Crime in particular is learned through experiences growing up at home, hanging out in the streets, trying to gain reputation, and experiences and interaction with where you live and the community you live in. How to cite General Sociology – Code of the Streets, Papers

Thursday, April 30, 2020

Orwell Essay free essay sample

There are an abundance of themes and issues explored in Nineteen Eighty-Four (hereafter â€Å"1984†) that relate to the object of power and its representation through the political state of â€Å"the party†, rebellion and language. Similarly, these themes of the use, abuse, and manipulation of power are used in the Peter Nicholson Cartoon in the Daily Telegraph (1/03/03), and the ? lm Enemy of the State directed by Tony Scott. Orwell begins 1984 with an introduction to the responder of a bleak world where individual freedom and personal civil liberties are non-existent; a world where absolute obedience to totalitarian rule is demanded. Contextually, at the time of Orwell’s writing, Hitler and Stalin’s division of humanity was at its peak, encompassing Orwell’s fear of the ultimate suppression of humanity. In writing 1984, Orwell attempts to discuss fraud, dishonesty, and immoral behaviour within politics, and in conveying these ideas, uses a variety of literary features to convey to the responder the extent of the abuse of power. We will write a custom essay sample on Orwell Essay or any similar topic specifically for you Do Not WasteYour Time HIRE WRITER Only 13.90 / page Setting and placement plays an integral role in 1984, as it has been exaggerated to reveal to the responder that the dystopian world of 1984 is de? nitely not ‘right. ’ for example the responder learns that in this world the â€Å"clock strikes thirteen. † Orwell continues to describe the setting through clever irony, especially in relation to the ministries of Oceania. The ministry of truth concerns itself with the manipulation of history, and the ministry of love â€Å"was the really frightening one. These paradoxical concepts are a satirical comment upon the manipulative power that humans possess with the underlying discourse of power in 1984 being that power is an omnipresent force that corrupts all things associated with it. Orwell successfully overwhelms the responder with the description of setting that parallels the notion of the individual, Winston, shrinking under the weight of authority. This representation is successfully displayed because it disgusts the responder with an austere world, which unfortunately for the fate of humanity, Orwell surmises is entirely plausible. The structure of power through di? rent classes of society is a feature of an oligarchical society, where hierarchy exists to determine the methods of power used to keep society under control. The proles represent society’s lowest class of citizens, kept insigni? cant through poverty 1 of 3 www. kewpid. net and denial of resources necessary for them to develop into a threat. Yet, the proles are signi? cant for society, as Winston points out â€Å"if there is hope†¦ it lies in the proles. † For Winston, they stand as a symbol of the warmth of humanity, able to think naturally. Moving up the hierarchy, Big Brother represents the highest class in the party’s ultimate rule. Symbolism is signi? cant to convey the importance of these elements, where Big Brother is the symbol of complete control, along with the slogan â€Å"Big Brother is watching you. † However, perhaps a most signi? cant symbol is that of the paperweight, with its soft beauty that symbolised ful? lment, â€Å"a little chunk of history that they’ve forgotten to alter. † Another representation of the power of the state, are the telescreens which are used to monitor the activities of citizens such as Winston, depriving them of all their personal liberties and privacy. A similar technique is used in the ? lm Enemy of the State, where the protagonist, Robert Dean, unknowingly comes into the possession of a videotape tying the deputy director of the NSA (National Security Agency) to a political assassination. Dean is hunted by the enormous human and electronic capabilities of the NSA. Scott portrays this through the thoughtful use of camera angles, panning and visual special e? ects to show the level of surveillance and monitoring of Dean through surveillance camera and telephoto imagery from geostationary satellites. Scott also employs a clever pun on the American cliche to depict this event – â€Å"In God we Trust, all others we monitor. † The perversity and hypocrisy of power is represented by actions of groups of power in both 1984 and the Peter Nicholson cartoon. In 1984 this is speci? cally represented by the doctrine of doublethink, where the party deems it acceptable for people to hold contradictory ideas and opinions simultaneously. Clearly, in reality this notion is completely illogical and unorthodox. Yet, the populace of Oceania (and presumably Eastasia and Eurasia) have been so successfully brainwashed that they hold the doctrine of doublethink to be both true and acceptable. The hypocrisy of power is evident to a lesser extent in the Peter Nicholson cartoon, which depicts Saddam Hussein and Kim Jong-il as gorillas in a zoo, being observed by John Howard and Alexander Downer. It represents the situation earlier in 2003 where world leaders stressed the impending danger of Iraq’s weapons of mass destruction, and that unilateral military action was the imperative step to disarm Iraq. The irony of the text is that whilst the Saddam Hussein gorilla is locked in a cage, with a sign saying â€Å"Danger†, a larger gorilla, Kim Jong-il, walks past the Saddam cage, with human bone and ice-cream cone in hand leaving a trail of blood, unnoticed by Howard and Downer. It represents the government’s hypocrisy in dealing with almost identical situations. Whilst Iraq and North Korea were supposedly both of immediate threat 2 of 3 www. kewpid. net to world security, the world’s attention was focussed on Iraq, whilst North Korea posed and identical if not greater danger. The government hypocritically declared it would support military action in Iraq, but chose to support diplomatic action in North Korea. Again, the extent to which the state holds power over its citizens is repulsive to the responder, successfully representing a situation which despite its improbability, is still somewhat possible. The inevitable rebellion to power becomes a dominant theme as 1984 progressed, paralleling with Julia and Winston’s gain of power through continual de? ance of party codes. Their sexual encounters had â€Å"been a battle, the climax a victory. It was a blow struck against the party. † Nevertheless, Winston and Julia’s rebellious attempts against the party proved to be futile, as Orwell demonstrated ultimate power through the symbolic role of O’Brien, representing mistrust and guiltless enforcement. The ending of 1984 contains a dianoetic irony, which Orwell uses to show power by reason, speci? cally as O’Brien forces Winston to believe that â€Å"2 and 2 makes 5. † At that stage, â€Å"O’Brien contained Winston’s mind†, demonstrating an undenying power that was constant and never-ending. Power is represented in these texts as a corrupting force through a particular group’s abuse of power to gain complete and utter control of everything within their context. 1984 showed this absolute sense of power over individuals by essentially removing their personal liberty, creating a shift of power towards the state. Through representations such as surveillance by the state, hypocrisy of power, and inevitable rebellion, the composers of the above texts successfully demonstrate the use, abuse, and manipulation of power. Orwell Essay free essay sample Powerplay involves the interplay of di? erent types of power relationships between the powerful and the opressed, and the extent to which power resides in individuals. There are an abundance of themes and issues explored in Nineteen Eighty-Four (hereafter â€Å"1984†) that relate to the object of power and its representation through the political state of â€Å"the party†, rebellion and language. Similarly, these themes of the use, abuse, and manipulation of power are used in the Peter Nicholson Cartoon in the Daily Telegraph (1/03/03), and the ? lm Enemy of the State directed by Tony Scott. Orwell begins 1984 with an introduction to the responder of a bleak world where individual freedom and personal civil liberties are non-existent; a world where absolute obedience to totalitarian rule is demanded. Contextually, at the time of Orwell’s writing, Hitler and Stalin’s division of humanity was at its peak, encompassing Orwell’s fear of the ultimate suppression of humanity. We will write a custom essay sample on Orwell Essay or any similar topic specifically for you Do Not WasteYour Time HIRE WRITER Only 13.90 / page In writing 1984, Orwell attempts to discuss fraud, dishonesty, and immoral behaviour within politics, and in conveying these ideas, uses a variety of literary features to convey to the responder the extent of the abuse of power. Setting and placement plays an integral role in 1984, as it has been exaggerated to reveal to the responder that the dystopian world of 1984 is de? nitely not ‘right. ’ for example the responder learns that in this world the â€Å"clock strikes thirteen. † Orwell continues to describe the setting through clever irony, especially in relation to the ministries of Oceania. The ministry of truth concerns itself with the manipulation of history, and the ministry of love â€Å"was the really frightening one. These paradoxical concepts are a satirical comment upon the manipulative power that humans possess with the underlying discourse of power in 1984 being that power is an omnipresent force that corrupts all things associated with it. Orwell successfully overwhelms the responder with the description of setting that parallels the notion of the individual, Winston, shrinking under the weight of authority. This representation is successfully displayed because it disgusts the responder with an austere world, which unfortunately for the fate of humanity, Orwell surmises is entirely plausible. The structure of power through di? rent classes of society is a feature of an oligarchical society, where hierarchy exists to determine the methods of power used to keep society under control. The proles represent society’s lowest class of citizens, kept insigni? cant through poverty 1 of 3 www. kewpid. net and denial of resources necessary for them to develop into a threat. Yet, the proles are signi? cant for society, as Winston points out â€Å"if there is hope†¦ it lies in the proles. † For Winston, they stand as a symbol of the warmth of humanity, able to think naturally. Moving up the hierarchy, Big Brother represents the highest class in the party’s ultimate rule. Symbolism is signi? cant to convey the importance of these elements, where Big Brother is the symbol of complete control, along with the slogan â€Å"Big Brother is watching you. † However, perhaps a most signi? cant symbol is that of the paperweight, with its soft beauty that symbolised ful? lment, â€Å"a little chunk of history that they’ve forgotten to alter. † Another representation of the power of the state, are the telescreens which are used to monitor the activities of citizens such as Winston, depriving them of all their personal liberties and privacy. A similar technique is used in the ? lm Enemy of the State, where the protagonist, Robert Dean, unknowingly comes into the possession of a videotape tying the deputy director of the NSA (National Security Agency) to a political assassination. Dean is hunted by the enormous human and electronic capabilities of the NSA. Scott portrays this through the thoughtful use of camera angles, panning and visual special e? ects to show the level of surveillance and monitoring of Dean through surveillance camera and telephoto imagery from geostationary satellites. Scott also employs a clever pun on the American cliche to depict this event – â€Å"In God we Trust, all others we monitor. † The perversity and hypocrisy of power is represented by actions of groups of power in both 1984 and the Peter Nicholson cartoon. In 1984 this is speci? cally represented by the doctrine of doublethink, where the party deems it acceptable for people to hold contradictory ideas and opinions simultaneously. Clearly, in reality this notion is completely illogical and unorthodox. Yet, the populace of Oceania (and presumably Eastasia and Eurasia) have been so successfully brainwashed that they hold the doctrine of doublethink to be both true and acceptable. The hypocrisy of power is evident to a lesser extent in the Peter Nicholson cartoon, which depicts Saddam Hussein and Kim Jong-il as gorillas in a zoo, being observed by John Howard and Alexander Downer. It represents the situation earlier in 2003 where world leaders stressed the impending danger of Iraq’s weapons of mass destruction, and that unilateral military action was the imperative step to disarm Iraq. The irony of the text is that whilst the Saddam Hussein gorilla is locked in a cage, with a sign saying â€Å"Danger†, a larger gorilla, Kim Jong-il, walks past the Saddam cage, with human bone and ice-cream cone in hand leaving a trail of blood, unnoticed by Howard and Downer. It represents the government’s hypocrisy in dealing with almost identical situations. Whilst Iraq and North Korea were supposedly both of immediate threat 2 of 3 www. kewpid. net to world security, the world’s attention was focussed on Iraq, whilst North Korea posed and identical if not greater danger. The government hypocritically declared it would support military action in Iraq, but chose to support diplomatic action in North Korea. Again, the extent to which the state holds power over its citizens is repulsive to the responder, successfully representing a situation which despite its improbability, is still somewhat possible. The inevitable rebellion to power becomes a dominant theme as 1984 progressed, paralleling with Julia and Winston’s gain of power through continual de? ance of party codes. Their sexual encounters had â€Å"been a battle, the climax a victory. It was a blow struck against the party. † Nevertheless, Winston and Julia’s rebellious attempts against the party proved to be futile, as Orwell demonstrated ultimate power through the symbolic role of O’Brien, representing mistrust and guiltless enforcement. The ending of 1984 contains a dianoetic irony, which Orwell uses to show power by reason, speci? cally as O’Brien forces Winston to believe that â€Å"2 and 2 makes 5. † At that stage, â€Å"O’Brien contained Winston’s mind†, demonstrating an undenying power that was constant and never-ending. Power is represented in these texts as a corrupting force through a particular group’s abuse of power to gain complete and utter control of everything within their context. 1984 showed this absolute sense of power over individuals by essentially removing their personal liberty, creating a shift of power towards the state. Through representations such as surveillance by the state, hypocrisy of power, and inevitable rebellion, the composers of the above texts successfully demonstrate the use, abuse, and manipulation of power.

Saturday, March 21, 2020

buy custom Toyota Motors Corporation essay

buy custom Toyota Motors Corporation essay Toyota motors corporation (Toyota) is an international firm that manufactures and distributes automobile. It manufactures vehicles and parts at 53 production sites in 27 countries and regions around the globe. The company has a network of 290 dealers and it employs approximate 40,000 sales personnels. This report present an in-depth analysis of the company for the last four years on the investment compared to its competitors(Nissan motors co. ltd and Honda motors co. ltd) (Chapman, Hopwood Shields, 2009). The analysis on the company investment indicates a strong financial position compared to the competitors (Nissan motors co. ltd and Honda motors co. ltd). In the four year period the company is enjoying a stable and positive trend financial position. The ratio is reducing all along the four years. As compared to the industry, the company is performing much better in terms of investment and debt management (Drury, 2006). The analyzed results reveal that the company is generating a decreasing proportionate return on equity. The company shows a better return on equity and this indicates that the company is utilizing shareholders equity well on the competitive environment. In the year 2010 the company uses every shareholder dollar to generate a better return on investment to the shareholders. In the same year the company uses shareholder equity efficiently to gain a better competitive edge than the year 2010 and 2009 (Mills, Call Drew, 2000). Buy custom Toyota Motors Corporation essay

Wednesday, March 4, 2020

Inspirational Quotes for Thanksgiving

Inspirational Quotes for Thanksgiving Imagine a nation where people did not bother to express gratitude. Imagine a society devoid of benevolence and humility. Unlike what some people believe, Thanksgiving is not a binge fest. Yes, the meal is a bit much. The dinner table is usually groaning with the weight of the food. With the abundance of delicious food, it is understandable why people give their weighing scales a holiday. The underlying philosophy behind Thanksgiving celebration is to offer thanks to God. You dont realize how fortunate you are to be blessed with abundant food, and a loving family. Many people are not that lucky. Thanksgiving gives you an opportunity to express gratitude. Millions of American families will join their hands in prayer to say grace. Thanksgiving is integral to American culture. On Thanksgiving, say a prayer of thanks to the Almighty, for the bountiful gifts bestowed upon you. Many years ago, the Pilgrims of Plymouth did so. They shared their food with the natives of the land, who had helped them in times of misery. The tradition of sharing the Thanksgiving meal continues even today. In honor of that tradition, share your gifts with friends and family. Spread the message of gratitude and kindness with inspirational quotes for Thanksgiving. Your heartfelt words can inspire your loved ones to make Thanksgiving a festival of generosity and love. Change people forever with these inspiring words. Henry Ward Beecher Gratitude is the fairest blossom which springs from the soul. Henry Jacobsen Praise God even when you dont understand what He is doing. Thomas Fuller Gratitude is the least of the virtues, but ingratitude is the worst of vices. Irving Berlin Got no checkbooks, got no banks. Still Id like to express my thanks I got the sun in the morning and the moon at night. Odell Shepard For what I give, not what I take,For battle, not for victory,My prayer of thanks I make. G. A. Johnston Ross If I have enjoyed the hospitality of the Host of this universe, Who daily spreads a table in my sight, surely I cannot do less than acknowledge my dependence. Anne Frank I do not think of all the misery, but of the glory that remains. Go outside into the fields, nature and the sun, go out and seek happiness in yourself and in God. Think of the beauty that again and again discharges itself within and without you and be happy. Theodore Roosevelt Let us remember that, as much has been given us, much will be expected from us, and that true homage comes from the heart as well as from the lips, and shows itself in deeds. William Shakespeare Small cheer and great welcome makes a merry feast. Alice W. Brotherton Heap high the board with plenteous cheer and gather to the feast, And toast the sturdy Pilgrim band whose courage never ceased. H. W. Westermayer The pilgrims made seven times more graves than huts... nevertheless, set aside a day of thanksgiving. William Jennings Bryan On Thanksgiving Day we acknowledge our dependence. Hebrews 13:15 By him therefore let us offer the sacrifice of praise to God continually, that is, the fruit of our lips giving thanks to his name. Edward Sandford Martin Thanksgiving Day comes, by statute, once a year; to the honest man it comes as frequently as the heart of gratitude will allow. Ralph Waldo Emerson For each new morning with its light,For rest and shelter of the night,For health and food, for love and friends,For everything Thy goodness sends. O. Henry There is one day that is ours. There is one day when all we Americans who are not self-made go back to the old home to eat saleratus biscuits and marvel how much nearer to the porch the old pump looks than it used to. Thanksgiving Day is the one day that is purely American. Cynthia Ozick We often take for granted the very things that most deserve our gratitude. Robert Casper Lintner Thanksgiving is nothing if not a glad and reverent lifting of the heart to God in honor and praise for His goodness. George Washington It is the duty of all Nations to acknowledge the providence of Almighty God, to obey his will, to be grateful for his benefits, and humbly to implore his protection and favor. Robert Quillen If you count all your assets, you always show a profit. Cicero A thankful heart is not only the greatest virtue, but the parent of all the other virtues.